Why Digital Security is a trade-off

Digital security is a trade-off. If securing digital data were the only concern a business had, users would have no control over their own computing environment at all – the Web would be forbidden territory; every disk drive would be welded shut. That doesn’t happen, of course, because workers also need the flexibility to communicate with one another and with the outside world.

The current compromise between security and flexibility is a sort of intranet-plus-firewall sandbox, where the IT department sets the security policies that workers live within. This allows workers a measure of freedom and flexibility while giving their companies heightened security.

That was the idea, anyway. In practice, the sandbox model is broken. Some of the problem is technological, of course, but most of the problem is human. The model is broken because the IT department isn’t rewarded for helping workers do new things, like finally passing the N.Y. Regents exam or studying for an advanced degree, but for keeping existing things from breaking. Workers who want to do new things are slowly taking control of networking, and this movement toward decentralized control cannot be reversed.

Best! Week! Ever!

NOT.

I said to my dentist back on Wednesday that so far my week had felt like a week of Monday’s. I’m still echoing those sentiments. But I gotta pause for the cause here and give shout out’s to Chris and Anne, who are responsible for two of the few bright spots to shine on me this week.

Anne sent me rockin’ mixed CD’s that have been on constant repeat since they arrived and Chris sent me not one but four mixed CD’s and an awesome looking book that I can’t wait to dive into. Thanks, guys…your timing is spot on.

So. Week of Mondays, The Recap:

Monday:

Still feeling a bit gypped about the quaint 3-bedroom bungalow that in reality has two bedrooms and is caving in, I start to get mighty discouraged about the whole house buying/selling process and wonder what the hell we thought we were doing putting our house up for sale now we’ll soon be in the dead of winter period.

My Review of The Book Thief

I’ve decided to start reviewing books here–at least for as long as it’s spring/summer and I have enough time to read whatever I darn well please. If you find yourself wondering what to read next, give Markus Zusak’s The Book Thief a spin. 

I bought my copy of The Book Thief at my favorite bookstore in the country–Village Books(Fairhaven, WA–an unfortunate location for me; I’m lucky if I make it there more than once in a year).

At once poetic and straightforward, hilarious and tragic, Markus Zusak’s The Book Thief  (despite the desperate circumstances of its setting) is bound to bring about a strange and unexpected nostalgia for childhood; for those innocent years when you believed nothing truly horrible could ever happen to you, or your friends, or loved ones. This nostalgia does not lose its value even as the innocence of the book’s young characters begins to slowly unpeel.

The Book Thief tells the story of  Liesel Meminger who, at the story’s outset, is illiterate. Nevertheless, an inexplicable compulsion leads Liesel to steal a book left lying in the snow beside her younger brother’s fresh grave. As it happens, the book is entitled The Gravedigger’s Handbook, and from it, Liesel will learn to read.