Chronic Morning Headaches and Sleep Posture

A headache is not the most ideal sensation to experience, but if a sufficient ruckus is somewhere nearby you are almost guaranteed to feel a slight pulsating in your head. Headache remedies can range from taking some over the counter medications to applying a cold compress to your head.

Even a discounted Hitachi magic wand massager or similar oscillating massager can provide for effective relief. In most cases, these are more than sufficient to quell the discomfort. However, someone who suffers from chronic headache might not be fully satisfied with these suggestions.

Waking up every morning to a headache can be incredibly frustrating, for the sole reason that you can’t recall anything you may have done to trigger the symptoms. As far as you’re concerned, you may have had a very low key day without any particular irregularities.

Learn to Crawl Before You Learn to Fly

Trying to write in advance about my first half marathon this Sunday is kind difficult to do. On one hand, the good old fashioned rail trail turkey trot isn’t going to end in me getting electrocuted and face planting in a pile of mud, or even scaling 16.5 miles of mountains for four hours.

On the other hand I am nowhere near being one of those dedicated inspiring runners who train hard for half marathons, no matter what their current skill level is.

I kind of fall into that category of, I know I can cover the distance, I have a rough idea of how I’m probably going to fare time wise, now let’s go outside and do something fun with a big group of people who share that love. No matter how it ends, I get a t-shirt, and my long run for the week is done.

Work/Life Balance

I have been taking a course on entrepreneurship via Coursera over the past couple days (side note, really cool website with hundreds of online classes for free in a wide range of topics) and it has mostly served as a support group for the things I already feel as a business owner. I find myself saying “amen!” and waving my arms around saying “this! this!” at a majority of the lectures.

Something that has resonated greatly to me is this over all theme that when you take on your own business endeavor, work/life balance is just a cute concept that nobody really cares about.

I squeezed in a nice ten miler on my birthday for my monthly virtual race goal, I had a quiet birthday dinner with my in laws as I ducked out of work for a few hours…

Stupid Book Titles

I was innocently browsing along today when it struck me how many dumb book titles there are. Here I’ll share with you a handful of the bizarre books I found:

1. Book #1: Cheese Problems Solved

This book Cheese Problems Solved is a must-have for anyone who faces chronic problems with cheese. For $249 (no, that’s not a typo) it better solve a heck of a lot more problems than just ones caused by cheese…

2. Book #2: How to Read a Book
At 426 pages, How To Read a Book may not be for beginners or people who have never read before.

Me against the (Exercise) Machine

Within the last 7 years or so, I learned some things about me and exercise. One, I love it. Two, I hate it. There have been many years where I have been addicted to exercise, where I once convince a sales person to give me 3 months of free gym use.

And on the flip side, I have also completely banned it for nearly a year while working at a gym. It has been a roller coaster of finding out the perfect balance (see also my post on running). Here is what I’ve come up with.

If I am going to include working out as part of my daily life then it has to be:

  • convenient
  • simple
  • affordable
  • loving

Convenience is important because, with years of ‘scientific’ research, I have discovered if I can’t walk to the gym- I am not going. It is that simple. I have tried dance classes, swimming pools, looked up great fun activities, but most of the time I ended up dreading the drive, the subway ride, or the extra time it took to get to the class. I would rather just stay still. A gym that is in the neighborhood has always worked the best for me.

I Believe In The Power Of Print

What can I say? I’m the sort of traveler who brings a multitude of books on any plane, train, or automobile trip. I need my pop/vacation fiction; I love reading “normal books. I need my serious, highbrow fiction; I need something spiritual; I need something educational. The e-reader lured me with its light, slim build and its capacity to house an entire library.

But when I saw an e-reader for the first time, my paranoid reaction was primarily fueled by 1960′s science fiction. Have you ever seen the episode of The Twilight Zone where a librarian in a future society is declared obsolete and sentenced to death?

Being a grade-school girl spent an inordinate amount of time in libraries, I was scared out of my mind by that episode. I had nightmares, in fact.

My Review of The Book Thief

I’ve decided to start reviewing books here–at least for as long as it’s spring/summer and I have enough time to read whatever I darn well please. If you find yourself wondering what to read next, give Markus Zusak’s The Book Thief a spin. 

I bought my copy of The Book Thief at my favorite bookstore in the country–Village Books(Fairhaven, WA–an unfortunate location for me; I’m lucky if I make it there more than once in a year).

At once poetic and straightforward, hilarious and tragic, Markus Zusak’s The Book Thief  (despite the desperate circumstances of its setting) is bound to bring about a strange and unexpected nostalgia for childhood; for those innocent years when you believed nothing truly horrible could ever happen to you, or your friends, or loved ones. This nostalgia does not lose its value even as the innocence of the book’s young characters begins to slowly unpeel.

The Book Thief tells the story of  Liesel Meminger who, at the story’s outset, is illiterate. Nevertheless, an inexplicable compulsion leads Liesel to steal a book left lying in the snow beside her younger brother’s fresh grave. As it happens, the book is entitled The Gravedigger’s Handbook, and from it, Liesel will learn to read.

Mastermind group: choose your own personal government

When I was a kid I had no imaginary friends; I have an imagi-Nation. The Sovereign Duchy of Borgonnia. You see I was born in Tenerife but lived in Gran Canaria. So what, you say? So there is an unhealthy rivalry between the two islands. Living in Gran Canaria I was always the chicharrero (”fish eater”) and when I went to my grandparents’ island on Tenerife I was the gofión (”gofio eater”) or even the traitor.

So I developed a strong distrust for anything that sounds like nationalism of any kind. And, I grew up without roots, nation wise. Now you know why I had an imaginary nation. You can guess its drawbacks. Let me share its benefit.

Thursday Haiku: Shadows by millions

I gave up my star

For sand, dust, pebbles, rocks, corn

Shadows by millions

You know one of the things kaizen is good for is increasing the quantity of your production. In my case I was quite concerned about two things: how much time I should run and how many posts I should publish.

Somehow, I was envisioning slowly raising both counts. Which is good. Problem is, where’s the limit? Kaizen is about continuous improvement, right? Yet does that mean a continuous increase in production? The question seemed a challenge to kaizen, indeed to any productivity method or system until I realized a simple truth:

It’s productivity, stupid, not production.

10 free subscriptions for Philosophers – Notes

Do you remember the first time you ate yogurt? I certainly do, because they came with a free toy. Yogurt and packed cereals were a novelty in Canary Islands back then. Something unknown they needed to present to reluctant parents and children alike.

Somehow it worked, because to this day I eat yogurt; toy or not toy. (As for cereal I quickly returned to the traditional gofio).

But the guys at Philosophers’ Notes are braver: they are giving a load of free yogurt, I mean, subscriptions.

So what are these PhilosophersNotes all about?